Celebrating one year of the Northern Sotho living dictionary with the Member of the Year

We are celebrating one year of the Northern Sotho living dictionary. The dictionary is possible because of our dedicated community members. 

To celebrate we identified our Member of the Year , Gadifele, and she took some time out to answer some questions for us.


Hello Gadifele, could you please tell us about yourself?

I am a woman, aged 38. I am residing in Johannesburg, in the Gauteng Province, but my birth place is Mašite, ga-Mphahlele. I am an engineer by profession. I enjoy visiting places, especially South African regions at large, and neighbouring countries. The types of books I like to read are fictions and biographies. I am a member of a reading club and we meet monthly. I also like to discuss politics, domestic affairs and the world at large with family members and friends.

What is your favourite idiom or saying in Northern Sotho, what does it mean, and why is it your favourite?

“You won’t succeed in life if you do not listen to advice!” again “You become a better person because of others. These proverbs mean a lot to me because they teach us how to respect others irrespective of their status in life, and you must show love and compassion not only to the members of your family, but even outsiders. 

What does the Northern Sotho language mean to you?

To me, Sesotho sa Leboa is my mother tongue. It is not only important to me alone, but also to all those people who call themselves Bapedi in totality because of its richness in culture and the legacy that we inherited from our ancestors. I can be overly grateful if there is growth in my language, and it lives on, so that we can share it with our children, forever and ever.

What other features would you like to see on the site?

It is gratifying to see what the site has already featured. Thank you so much! I can be very glad to see you featuring folk tales and ancient songs like: "Ka gata llere la nthelela! Tinte! ..." (I step on a ladder and it slipped! Chant!)


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